I Am Clever

alec_towser


A Fine Line - Between Chaos and Creation

Everybody seems to think I'm lazy; I don't mind, I think they're crazy...


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Day Eighty-Eight (Aka: Passover)
I Am Clever
alec_towser
Sorry about the lateness of this; however, it was a long day yesterday and I couldn't think straight to compose my thoughts for this entry.

Although my family isn't Jewish, we celebrated Passover earlier today. We've done it for 9-10 years now, and I always enjoy it.



Have some pictures of our Seder table:

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The full table, with our texts for reading.



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The Seder plate. Includes (clockwise from top left) Bowl of salt water, parsley sprigs (called karpas), horseradish (called maror), roasted egg, apple-cinnamon nut mixture (called charoseth), and a lamb shank bone.

QUICK - EXPLANATION OF THE SEDER PLATE TIME!

The salt water and karpas are used together - the karpas is dipped in the salt water and eaten, to symbolize the new life that comes from spring, the season when Passover is celebrated, and the tears that were shed during their slavery.

The maror, or bitter herbs, is used to represent the bitterness of slavery.

The roasted egg is a symbol in many different cultures, usually signifying springtime and renewal. Here it stands in place of one of the sacrificial offerings which was performed in the days of the Second Temple. This egg isn’t eaten during the meal; the shell just needs to look really roasted.

The charoseth is representative of the mortar used to make bricks in Egypt.

Lastly, the lamb shank bone represents the lamb sacrifice that the Jewish people had to make the night of the first Passover, where they then had to use the blood to mark their door frames so the Angel of Death would pass their families by.

There's way more to the Passover than this, but there's at least a bit of an overview for you all. Hope you all learned something today.

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